Varoglutamstat in Early Alzheimer's Disease

What is the Purpose of this Study?

This study focuses on individuals who have memory problems that are consistent with early Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and potential benefit of an oral investigational drug called varoglutamstat (PQ912) in Alzheimer’s disease. The study aims to identify the best dose of varoglutamstat and determine whether it delays or slows the progression of the symptoms of early Alzheimer’s disease by targeting amyloid, one of the proteins that accumulates in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Participants will be randomly assigned to receive either varoglutamstat or placebo (inactive substance).


Eligibility

  • Age 50-89 (inclusive) at screening
  • Diagnosed as having Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Mild probable AD according to workgroups of the Diagnostic Guidelines of the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA)
  • Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score 20-30 inclusive at screening
  • Montreal Cognitive Assessment score (MoCA) < 26 at screening
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Where can I participate?

Beverly

More about this Clinical Trial

What is the full name of this clinical trial?

A Phase 2A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Varoglutamstat in Patients with Early Alzheimer's Disease with a Stage Gate to Phase 2B

Study Details
Disease Type/Condition

Alzheimer's disease, Memory Disorders

Principal Investigator

Kremen, Sarah

Age Group

Adult

Phase

II

IRB Number

STUDY00002176

ClinicalTrials.gov ID

NCT03919162

Key Eligibility
ClinicalTrials.gov

How do I learn more about this study?
Email
clinicaltrials@cshs.org
Study Detail
Disease Type/Condition

Alzheimer's disease, Memory Disorders

Principal Investigator

Kremen, Sarah

Age Group

Adult

Phase

II

IRB Number

PBD01187

ClinicalTrials.gov ID

NCT03919162

Key Eligibility
ClinicalTrials.gov

Contact
Email
clinicaltrials@cshs.org